The Fix with Michelle King
Educating Kids About Climate Change: Sarah Goody

Educating Kids About Climate Change: Sarah Goody

February 17, 2021

It is never too early to engage young women and men in the fight against climate change. The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change provided a wake-up call about the importance of teaching kids about sustainability. The report warns that greenhouse gas levels are at their highest in 800,000 years.

The findings signal the need for drastic action globally at all levels of society including among governments, businesses, communities, and schools. This includes educating kids across all age groups and levels of schooling to prepare them to be able to live more sustainable lives.


In this episode, we're featuring 16-year old climate activist Sarah Goody who is launching a 4 Part “Climate Action Crash Course” Webinar Series for Youth and Young Adults. Sarah will share her work and reveal how we need to engage the next generation of women and men in the fight against climate change.

How To Be A Male Ally At Work: David Smith and Brad Johnson

How To Be A Male Ally At Work: David Smith and Brad Johnson

February 11, 2021

When it comes to advancing women at work, there is a gap between the commitment male allies say they have and what they are actually doing. It’s the same as the conversation around race: It’s not enough to say you’re not a racist, you have to actually do something to create change and take action.

On this episode, David G. Smith, Ph.D. and W. Brad Johnson, Ph.D. show why and how men have a crucial role to play in promoting gender equality at work. Research shows that when men are deliberately engaged in gender inclusion programs, 96 percent of women in those organizations perceive real progress in gender equality, compared with only 30 percent of women in organizations without strong male engagement. Smith, a sociologist, and Johnson, a clinical psychologist, are former naval officers with a mission to help men become more effective allies with women and more inclusive leaders in the workplace.

How To Be An Ally: Wade Davis

How To Be An Ally: Wade Davis

January 30, 2021

Creating a more equal workplace, where you feel like you can be yourself and will be valued for that, is going to take all of us. Research finds that unequal work environments —where employees dread going  to work, don’t feel they can be honest with their manager, and may witness or experience harassment or discrimination — are the primary reasons workers quit their jobs. Approximately one in four employees dreads going to work because they do not feel safe, respected, or valued. Inequality creates exclusion and isolation, detrimentally impacting innovation, productivity, engagement, and retention. Allyship programs are one way to make employees aware of how inequality works and what they can do to solve it. For example, a 2018 study conducted by Business in the Community found that 33% of Black employees believe their ethnicity will be a barrier to their next career move, in stark contrast to just 1% of white employees. Allyship at work helps to bring the challenges of racism in organizations to the surface and importantly, how each of us can practice anti-racism.

On today’s episode Wade Davis, VP of Inclusion within the Product group at Netflix will be joining us on the show to discuss all things allyship.

Laura Bates: Everyday Sexism Project

Laura Bates: Everyday Sexism Project

January 15, 2021

It seems to be increasingly difficult to talk about sexism, equality, and women’s rights in a modern society that perceives itself to have achieved gender equality. When women or men complain about everyday sexism or suggest that you are unhappy about the way in which women are portrayed and perceived renders you likely to be labeled difficult or uptight.
Laura Bates, founder of the Everyday Sexism Project has spearheaded a global movement to raise awareness of the day-to-day experiences of sexism women have to endure.
Through the project, Laura has cataloged stories from hundreds of women detailing their experiences of sexism.

Solving inequality starts with tackling it. On this episode, Laura Bates will be joining us to discuss the project and how you can take action to eradicate everyday sexism.

Dr. Daniel Susskind: Are Robots Going To Take Your Job?

Dr. Daniel Susskind: Are Robots Going To Take Your Job?

January 6, 2021

Technology adoption could displace millions from their jobs; many others will need to change the way they work. Globally, 40 million to 160 million women may need to transition between occupations by 2030, often into higher-skilled roles. If they make these transitions, women could find more productive, better paid work; if they don’t, they could face a growing wage gap or leaving the labor market.

COVID-19 has had a detrimental impact on gender equality and resulted in hundreds of thousands of women leaving the workforce. To prevent this from happening again, we need to understand the technological changes that are coming and the impact they are likely to have, and whether this will be different for men and women.

Joining us on the show today is Dr Daniel Susskind who is the co-author of the best-selling book, "The Future of the Professions" and the author of "A World Without Work." We will discuss the impact of technology, particularly artificial intelligence, on work and society and most importantly, answer the question on everyone’s mind: Are robots going to take your job? And, what can you do to prepare for the future world of work?

Deepak Chopra and Gabriella Wright: Free Program To Support Women’s Mental Health

Deepak Chopra and Gabriella Wright: Free Program To Support Women’s Mental Health

December 18, 2020

More women and girls are experiencing stress, anxiety, and other mental health impacts as a result of the pandemic. Experts warn that this could have devastating long-term impacts. In September, the nonprofit organization Care released findings from a study investigating 10,000 men and women's experiences of mental health across 40 countries. The findings show that 27% of women had reported increases in challenges in relation to mental illness, compared to 10% of men. The reason for the gender disparity in mental wellbeing is a result of several factors such as unpaid labor in the house which increased exponentially in many cases led to stress, worries about food, work, and health care.

Women are more prone to experience gender-based violence during lockdown. They are also almost twice as likely to find it harder to access quality healthcare services needed during the pandemic. The facts behind the COVID-19 pandemic crisis reveal that mothers of small children are three times more likely than fathers to lose their jobs. Single mothers are faring even worse. At the same time, suicide is the second leading cause of death among young adults, but statistically higher for young women.

That is why Deepak Chopra and Gabriella Wright, this week's guests, have teamed up to support women with the Love in Action campaign, which provides all women with free access to a three-month course designed by Deepak to take on and overcome the mental health challenges women are grappling with. The initiative will partner with EBY, the women's underwear brand, to support and empower women to realize their full potential. On today's episode, Deepak and Gabriella will share more about this incredible initiative.

 

You can learn more about Love in Action at blog.join-eby.com/deepak-chopra

Tamra Ryan: Life After Lock Up

Tamra Ryan: Life After Lock Up

December 10, 2020

The number of people incarcerated in America today is more than four times larger than it was in 1980. The criminal justice system disproportionately impacts poor and Black men and women. The experiences of women — as well as trans and nonbinary people — are too often lost, because men comprise the vast majority of the incarcerated population. Research is shedding light on the injustices faced by women and LGBTQ+ people behind bars, as well as on issues like money bail and family separation that disproportionately affect women.

Currently, there are 231,000 women locked up in the United States. While women make up just 10 percent of the total incarcerated population, women's incarceration rates are continuing to grow faster than men's. On today’s episode, Tamra Ryan, CEO of Women's Bean Project, will share the difficulties women face reentering society and the working world after serving jail time. She will share her work to humanize re-entry through employment and how we tackle the current flaws in the corrections system.

Tamara Gillian: The Status of Women And Money

Tamara Gillian: The Status of Women And Money

November 25, 2020

According to data from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, four times more women than men dropped out of the labor force in September 2020. This is having a detrimental impact on women’s financial health. Research shows that the gender savings gap has widened as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic with women now having a third less saved. More women than men are relying on previous savings to cover essential costs during the pandemic — depleting their already smaller savings pot. Over a third of women (35%) admitted to dipping into their savings over the past six months, compared to just 15% of men.

To better understand the financial gap women are experiencing during the pandemic, Tamara Gillian, founder of The WealthiHer Network, will be joining us on this episode. Tamara will share findings from The WealthiHer Report 2020, which provides us with insights to better understand how Covid-19 has impacted women and altered their attitudes to wealth, life, and their finances.

May Habib: Is Zoom Making Your Work Culture Toxic?

May Habib: Is Zoom Making Your Work Culture Toxic?

November 18, 2020

When millions of U.S. office workers were sent to work from home in March to curb the spread of the coronavirus, employers did something few have done successfully at scale — they sent corporate culture home with them.
For several weeks in the spring, office professionals banded together to adjust to a new way of living and working online. But as weeks of remote work have stretched into months, it’s becoming clear the toxic environment sometimes housed in office cubicles and shared break rooms is moving into workers’ homes, too.

On today’s episode, May Habib, CEO of Writer, recently released findings from a new survey that sheds light on the state of workplace communication during the pandemic. The company surveyed more than 1,000 employees on how they interact with co-workers over media such as chat and videoconference and found that racial and ethnic minority participants reported a far higher incidence of toxic communication, such as racist, discriminatory, bullying, and sexually inappropriate messages, than white people do.

Michelle King: How To Get More Women In Power And Keep Them There

Michelle King: How To Get More Women In Power And Keep Them There

November 13, 2020

Last weekend, Kamala Harris made history when she became America's first female, first Black and first South Asian vice president-elect, representing a new face of political power. The California senator's history-making win also represents the millions of women in the demographics -- often overlooked, historically underrepresented, and systematically ignored -- who are now the recipients of that new power for the first time in the country's 200-plus-year history.

On this special episode, my former UN Women colleague, Selina Suresh, will be interviewing me on how we can get more women, like Kamala into positions of power, and more importantly, keep them there.

Podbean App

Play this podcast on Podbean App